Navigate / search

Green Deals Alert: Save up to 30% on a Green Hotel

When people ask me for advice on reaching the “green segment,” I always say the same thing: green consumers still want a good deal. When eco-friendly products first hit the market, there was a misguided belief that customers were willing to pay a “green premium” for a more sustainable product.

At Travelocity we believe that you should be able to go green and save some green while you’re at it.

green sale

Right now, we’re running a green hotel sale that highlights eco-friendly hotels with great customer reviews. You can save up to 30% on these green hotels that dazzle their visitors with luxe amenities, personalized service, and gorgeous rooms.

But what exactly does that mean for your budget? Let’s take a look at some of the deals!

Luxury Maui: If you’ve been to Maui, then you’ve probably heard about the Grand Wailea. Renowed for its unmatched luxury and picture-perfect beach, this resort is also working hard to go green from the inside out. And right now, you can stay at this eco-paradise for just $369/night. Normally rates are well into the $500/night range.

Sin-Free in Sin City: At one time, Las Vegas was one of the least eco-friendly destinations in the world. But those days are over. With the CityCenter now open, Sin City is on the path to a more sustainable future. And thanks to our sale, it’s affordable too. I just shopped for a seven-night Flight + Hotel vacation (departing from SFO, including two people) that includes a seven-night stay at the brand-new, uber-green Aria Resort and the prices are jaw-dropping. You could spend a green week in Vegas for just $534 a person!

Vegas deal

What’s the hitch? Well, you’ve got to hurry. The Good to Be Green Hotel Sale expires July 31st. More than 150 green hotels are participating. Just look for the green hotel sale banner as you shop across our site!

Alison

My name: Alison Presley

Nickname: Presbo, because I'm good police.

How I earn my keep: I'm the manager of Travelocity's Travel for Good program. Visit Travel for Good to learn more about our green travel and voluntourism initiatives!

What kind of traveler am I: I'm an intrepid food explorer. I usually starve myself on the plane (not that that's too hard to do) so that the moment my toes touch foreign soil I'm ready to sample new and exciting cuisine. I like to dine everywhere from hole-in-the-wall local secrets to Michelin Guide gems. Cannel├ęs, poi, boiled peanuts, oxtail soup, poutine--there's no stopping this adventurous palate.

Greatest travel lesson I've learned: It doesn't cost a lot of money to do good. Offsetting your carbon impact only adds a few bucks to your trip, green hotels are very affordable, and volunteering locally during your vacation is a great way to give back and learn about the culture.

Comments

Chris Talintyre
Reply

Thanks great article! You’ve inspired me to write my own green travel article. Do you have any advice on calculating carbon footprints for holidays including flight?

Amy
Reply

Your carbon footprint can vary depending on the calculator.

Here are a few options from http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/feb/19/carbon.web

http://www.carbonfootprint.com/calculator.aspx calculates both direct and indirect footprint, taking into account basic information on food choices, recycling, leisure activities and shopping habits in addition to burning of fossil fuels.

http://www.resurgence.org/education/carbon-calculator.html requires you to provide more detailed information. It also attempts to include some indirect greenhouse contributions in sections such as “fuel-intensive leisure activities”.

http://www.chooseclimate.org/flying/mf.html enables you to specify the type of ticket, model of plane and occupancy rate. It displays its findings as kilograms of fuel used, kilograms of CO2 generated, and the total warming effect. The latter takes into account other emissions from aviation, such as nitrogen oxides and water vapor, and the fact that CO2 emitted at high altitude has an enhanced warming effect.

http://www.transportdirect.info/Web2/JourneyPlanning/JourneyEmissionsCompare.aspx provides a means to compare the emissions made by a small car, large car, train, coach and plane for a set distance. It is, however, likely to be some time before we can accurately compare travel to a wide range of destinations by train, plane, ferry, car and coach.

Chris Talintyre
Reply

Thanks Amy, that’s really helpful! I’ll take a look and let you know once I’ve posted the article…

Leave a comment

name*

email* (not published)

website