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How to Run a City

Today is Halloween, I am aware. However, there is something about fall weather in New York that gets people thinking about one thing in particular: The Marathon (We don’t call it the ING New York City Marathon. We’re New Yorkers, there is no need to modify. We live in the City, we eat pizza and cheesecake, and we run in the Marathon). This weekend, I am running the Marathon. A mixture of excitement and fear has been welling up for weeks. This will not be my first marathon, but it will be my first marathon in my hometown. To help with my training, I was recently given the opportunity to take a running tour around my fair city with City Running Tours, which popped up in a post this time last year

Ssshhhh, Quiet Please!

I was on a flight from San Francisco to London last week—that’s a ten-hour flight, may I remind you—and I found myself with a curious problem. In all my years of flying, I’d never seen—well, heard-–anything like it. And so I didn’t know how to deal.

The problem? The people sitting behind me would NOT. STOP. TALKING.

Seriously, they just wouldn’t stop. There were three of them and they were chattering as we sat on the runway. Then they were chattering as we took off. Then they were chattering while drinks were served, then they were chattering while dinner was served, and then they were still chattering while the shades were drawn and the lights were dimmed and everyone else in the cabin took the hint and went to sleep. And they weren’t chattering quietly—or even at a normal level, come to think of it. These people were loud.

Perturbed, I tried giving them a meaningful look. (A tad passive-aggressive, I know, but it’s my tried-and-tested method for dealing with seat-kickers and armrest-stealers, and it usually works like a charm.) Nothing happened: the talking continued. Loudly. I put my earphones on and tried to watch a movie instead.

The kicker? I COULD HEAR THEM TALKING OVER MY MOVIE.

And so I turned around.

Ways to Hoard Miles this Holiday (Buying) Season

I’m currently facing one tough decision: sassy new fall boots or New Year’s getaway? If only I could have both…or can I? With the economy taking a slide, Americans are thinking about everything from dining out to travel expenditures to big ticket buys. But, what if my fall wardrobe could actually pay for my weekend trip? Well…maybe it can.

According to the Wall Street Journal, more and more consumers are redeeming their frequent flier miles to help pay for their trips. The question is: are you well on your way to a free getaway? Or are you losing opportunities to accumulate miles? With the holiday travel (and buying) season coming up, there are a few things you can do that will get you closer to your trip.

Power Through with Power Naps

I was recently rushing down a street in midtown Manhattan, trying to dodge raindrops, when an unusual sign stopped me in my tracks: a storefront was inviting me in for a nap.

I decided after a moment that I had enough willpower to pass up the offer and make it to my appointment on time (plus, the store looked suspiciously like one of those fancy new frozen-yogurt shops), but I kept thinking about the unusual spa, and when I got home, I investigated.

Photo courtesy of IgoUgo member quinius

Pregnant Will Travel, But Can I Have That Seat?

I am 32 weeks or eight months pregnant. And I still travel everyday, mostly to work or the doctor. I’ve got a biiiig ol’ belly. Yet still I manage to hoof it down the street and huff down the steps of the New York City subway or onto the bus. Though I must admit I’m not quite as agile as I used to be standing on a moving vehicle. When you’re pregnant, and the larger you grow, the more off-balance you seem to get. At least that’s how it is to me. (To imagine what this feeling might be like picture yourself with a 20 pound beachball tucked into your shirt. You’re probably starting to get the picture…) And yet, I stand almost everyday wherever I go. And it’s not because I am dying for the adventure — it’s because people are really clueless! And it’s not just in New York.